Cloud semantics and Ground-Level observations

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I am commenting every once and a while on SOA and Cloud discussions at ebizQ forums. Recently I noticed a growing sensitivity to semantics – Private vs. Public Cloud, Web vs. Cloud, Web 3.0…

This prompted me to post here a couple of recent comments I made on the Cloud Computing forum

How much “Cloud” are “Private Clouds”?

I do not think that Cloud is about semantics, but rather about practice and reality within a concept. My personal experience shows that Enterprises are indeed implementing “Cloud Architecture” solutions which are substituting fat Client-Server implementations, but mostly using the traditional business model (perpetual ownership and in-house or hosted location) – when it concerns core and customized solutions. Cloud based infrastructure and applications delivered as a service and on-demand are indeed still limited to “commodity solutions” – collaboration, CRM, etc…

I described a couple of cases in The Extended Enterprise – from vision to reality with Rich Internet Application technology, and I find a consensus with many industry analysts that these types of implementations are well part of what they observe as Cloud implementations. I do not care much about how it is named, and if people prefer to reserve “Cloud” for a more restrictive checklisted definition that’s fine with me – but what I describe above is a very tangible reality of an application architecture that leverages internet based technologies – hosting resources, communications and clients.

Is “Web” distinct from “Cloud”?

I must admit that I do not understand very well the distinction between Web and Cloud. For me, Cloud is an integral part of the Web, relating to several aspects of it – in particular architecture and ubiquitous access to hardware and software resources. So they are converged already.

I perceive the Cloud “phenomenon” as firming up the business nature of the Web on the IT side, paving the way for Enterprises to exploit the Web not only for communication related aspects (from email to ecommerce and marketing) but also for the deployment of core applications. I am presently involved in such a project that brings the notion of “play list” to a composite application for financial brokers and portfolio managers in a global financial institution, incorporating most of the “bells and whistles” of Web2.0 user experience and a hybrid Cloud and Legacy backend. That is what I consider as Convergence – but the main converging domains here are Web and traditional Enterprise IT.

In my opinion, semantics are necessary for a meaningful communication, but let’s not overdo it. And how do you see it?

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One response to “Cloud semantics and Ground-Level observations

  1. Avigdor, I agree. Whenever people start arguing fervently over taxonomy, semantics and definitions, I smell market positioning and turf at risk.

    To be sure, cloud computing has both a technical and a business dimension. Since the term is not tied a technical protocol or specification, one can expect different vendors to try to stretch the definition of a buzzword that is “in play” to include their offerings. These are the vendors who just join in the hype for the bandwagon effect. At the same time, other vendors with fairly narrow offerings will try to position themselves as “purists.” They want to limit the definitions so that their offerings receive the most attention and benefit.

    Where I think the real attention should be paid is on the value delivered. Does cloud computing deliver value? Your story is a great example of how it can not only deliver value but break down walls. Thanks for sharing this story that stretches from the horn of Africa to the heart of Europe… and beyond.

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