Monthly Archives: March 2010

A reality check on “citizen development”

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The topic of Citizen Development recently received a lot of attention – the latest coming from new Gartner report and from ebizQ forums. So I’d like to revisit it.

The temptation of “citizen” application development dates back to the prehistory of the PC – the introduction of micro computers and products such as Framework and dBase. That was the time when we entered the market with Magic Software, and I supported the thesis that 4GL’s enable line of business experts to directly implement business applications shortcutting much of the traditional development and programming process. Reality proved otherwise, showing that such easy to use tools actually amplify lack of IT skills, which sometimes led to very unhappy endings. We revised our approach very fast to target system analysts rather than LOB professionals, and observed amazing results – very small teams providing very rich and comprehensive applications (an example in More about Enterprise RIA in practice).

Nowadays, I believe that citizen development can be effective provided the following combination: easy and intuitive assembly and composition tools with adequately enforced governance, and a professionally developed collection of services (building blocks). A good example of such a mix is Convertigo.com, which evolved from Programmatic Integration to Enterprise Mashup’s and now to SOA backend enablement (targeted at IT professionals via an Eclipse based studio) and Front-End composition (targeted at citizen developers with Convertigo’s own Composer as well as other popular composition tools).

What do you think about Citizen Development?

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Being pragmatic about Multitenancy and Cloud Computing

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I used to think that multitenancy was a key incentive for Cloud Computing. The experience of the last couple of years leads me to a different view. The Cloud makes IT more ubiquitous, but multitenancy is far from being ubiquitous – so most of the services offered in the cloud are either not multitenant or use some kind of shared-hardware scheme (virtualization). So far there seems to be more cloud computing capacity than there is a demand for it – so the improved resource usage aspect is not so important. I also see that many enterprises adopt the Cloud advantages for their own software, for example rolling out core enterprise applications as RIA’s to their extended ecosystem partners and thus streamlining the supply chain and reducing costs.

My conclusion is that multitenancy is more of a future feature that would emerge when the economy would mandate it. So my recommendation is to adopt application platforms that enable multitenancy and develop future applications as such, and in the meantime take advantage of the Cloud using pragmatic approaches.